Soy allergy symptoms

Soy is a common food that can cause allergies. In many cases, soy allergy starts since the first years of life by allergy formulas including soy milk. Although most children outgrow soy allergy, its manifestations may persist into adulthood. In most cases, the signs and symptoms are mild soy allergy: hives or itching around the mouth. In rare cases, soy allergy may cause allergic reactions including severe that a person can be life-threatening (anaphylaxis).
The doctor needs to know if an individual has different reactions after consumption of soy. Soy allergy can be diagnosed using specific tests. Anyone manifest such an allergy should avoid any product that contains soy. This can be difficult, because soy is found in the composition of many food products: meat, bakery products, chocolate, cereals.

Causes
All food allergies are caused by an immune system reaction. It identifies certain soy proteins as harmful, which stimulates the production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) – antibodies to soy proteins (allergens). The next contact with these soy allergen IgE antibodies will recognize and I will signal the immune system to release histamine and other chemicals into the bloodstream.
Following this, there are a number of signs and symptoms of an allergy. Histamine is partly responsible for most allergic responses: runny nose, itchy eyes, sore throat, rashes and hives, nausea, diarrhea, difficulty breathing and even anaphylactic shock.
Soy allergy symptoms

Some of the symptoms of soy are:

  • Acne;
  • Angioneurotic edema;
  • Rhinitis;
  • Diarrhea;
  • Atrophic dermatitis;
  • Itching around the mouth;
  • Dizziness or fainting.

Anaphylaxis – a severe reaction to soy
Anaphylaxis or severe reaction to soy is quite rare. It affects people who suffer from asthma or allergies to other foods such as peanuts.
Anaphylaxis cause several types of extreme symptoms including:

  • Narrowing of the airways, swelling of the throat, feeling of lump in the throat that contribute to difficulty breathing;
  • Severe and sudden drop in blood pressure;
  • Rapid pulse;
  • Loss of consciousness.

Risk Factors
Certain risk factors increase the chances that a person can develop an allergy to soy:

  • Family history – the risk is higher to manifest an allergy to soy or other medications if allergies are present in family history as: hay fever, asthma, hives, eczema, etc..
  • Age – Soy allergies are most common in children (especially children and infants). As the digestive system matures, a person’s body is able to synthesize food and food components that trigger allergies.
  • Allergies – in some cases, people who are already allergic to wheat, beans, milk or other foods may have allergic reactions to soy.

Risk Factors
Certain risk factors increase the chances that a person can develop an allergy to soy:
– Family history – the risk is higher to manifest an allergy to soy or other medications if allergies are present in family history as: hay fever, asthma, hives, eczema, etc..
– Age – Soy allergies are most common in children (especially children and infants). As the digestive system matures, a person’s body is able to synthesize food and food components that trigger allergies.
– Allergies – in some cases, people who are already allergic to wheat, beans, milk or other foods may have allergic reactions to soy.

Tests and diagnosis
The doctor will ask the patient details on the symptoms manifested them may deem necessary to carry out a physical examination to find or rule out other medical problems. May be useful some of these tests:

  • Skin test – in this test, the skin is punctured and exposed to small amounts of proteins found in soy. If a person is allergic, where there is a bulge in the skin made ​​contact with the allergen.
  • Blood test – a blood test can measure the immune response to soy by measuring the amount of antibodies in the bloodstream – immunoglobulin E (IgE). A blood sample is sent to a laboratory for testing soy allergy.

The doctor will ask the patient details on the symptoms manifested them may deem necessary to carry out a physical examination to find or rule out other medical problems. May be useful some of these tests:
– Skin test – in this test, the skin is punctured and exposed to small amounts of proteins found in soy. If a person is allergic, where there is a bulge in the skin made ​​contact with the allergen.
– Blood test – a blood test can measure the immune response to soy by measuring the amount of antibodies in the bloodstream – immunoglobulin E (IgE). A blood sample is sent to a laboratory for testing soy allergy.

Treatments and drugs
The only way to prevent an allergic reaction is to avoid soy and soy protein.
Medications such as antihistamines may reduce the signs and symptoms of soy allergy. These drugs can be taken after exposure to soy in order to control the reaction and relieve discomfort. Despite the efforts of many people consume soy. If there is a serious allergic reaction, you may need an emergency injection of epinephrine and emergency medical advice.
Any person who knows that an anaphylactic shock can occur in soybeans, you should have a permanently EpiPen with epinephrine injection. Your doctor will provide details on using the tool.

Lifestyle and home remedies
Anyone who has had a severe allergic reaction to soy should always carry EpiPen or other tools that allow immediate injection of epinephrine. It may also be necessary to apply a clamp to one of the hands that will be scored an alert message on soy allergy.

Prevention
There is no safe way that could prevent allergy to foods containing soy. For young children, breastfeeding or using a soy-based formula can be useful. Breastfeeding in at least the first four months is indicated for reducing the risk of food allergies.
If a person knows he is allergic to soy, the only way of prevention is to avoid soy products as much information to help make this possible.
Peanuts may be required including exclusion from the diet, as they may contain allergens similar to those of soybeans. For some processed soy foods (soy sauce, soybean oil) will not trigger allergy because the processing are eliminated certain proteins that may underlie allergies.
Soy milk, adamame, tofu and other soy products have become popular due to their apparent health benefits.
If a food label is specified any of these names, it contains soy:

  • Soya;
  • Soy;
  • Soybeans;
  • Glycine max;
  • Edamame.

However, because soy is a common ingredient found in foods, it is not easy to detect. Soy can be found in: pastries, butter substitutes, ice cream, desserts, spices, meat products, meat, candy, etc..
Some of the hidden sources of soybean can be listed:

  • Hydrolyzed vegetable protein (PVH);
  • Textured vegetable protein (PVT);
  • Lecithin;
  • Monodigliceride;
  • Monosodium glutamate;
  • Vegetable oil;
  • Vitamin E.

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